Full and half day pre-conference workshops are planned for Tuesday, November 13, the day before the main Conference proceedings. A fascial anatomy prosection workshop is planned for Saturday-Monday, November 10-12, and a one-day dissection workshop on November 13.

Workshops will be presented in the English language unless otherwise noted below.

You can select any one Tuesday full day presentation or any two half day sessions.
FULL DAY: Tuesday, November 13, 2018, 09:00 – 18:00
HALF DAY AM: Tuesday, November 13, 2018, 09:00 – 13:00
HALF DAY PM: Tuesday, November 13, 2018, 14:00 – 18:00

WORKSHOP FEE: EU 150 for Tuesday half day workshops, EU 250 for a Tuesday full day workshop.

Please click the presenter names to view their bios.

Full Day Workshops (Tuesday)

1. How fascial connections affect breathing and movement
Jouko Heiskanen, MD, PT
Tuulia Luomala, PT
Mika Pihlman, PT

Details

This workshop will demonstrate myofascial cooperation between the diaphragm, abdominal cavity, thoracolumbar fascia, and pelvic floor. It will include real-time ultrasound evaluation to assess manual therapy interventions, posture and dynamic functional exercises. Participants will work in small groups and receive individual guidance. Tests, movements and treatment techniques are combined to add to the participants’ clinical toolbox.

Learning Outcomes:

  • Realtime ultrasound evaluation and visualization of myofascial lines/tonus, diaphragm and pelvic floor muscles in different postures, during relaxation and in dynamic activation
  • Tests for thoracolumbar fascia and abdominal area in different postures and effects of breathing.
  • Treatment techniques to enhance optimal breathing.
Hide Details

2. TMJ Intensive
Peter Schwind, PhD
Heike Jäger, PhD

Details

This workshop will teach efficient manual techniques to treat TMJ dysfunctions. It will include precise diagnostics using manual tests, combined with the evaluation of imaging and a sequence of clearly described manual interventions for related fascia, ligaments, and the joint capsule of the TMJ. On a theoretical level, the workshop provides an understanding of the scientific base to understand how fascial strain patterns develop and how they manifest within the morphology of tissues. Special emphasis will be put on the outcomes of recent anatomical and biological research. Students will receive a step-by-step protocol to recognize areas of strain related to TMJ dysfunction and basic tests to distinguish minor from significant strain.

Hide Details

3. Myofascial Continuities in Assessment and Practice
Tom Myers, LMT, BCSI

Details

Learn to see, analyse, and resolve body-wide postural patterns through understanding the myofascial force transmission through the body’s membranous medium. In this workshop we will review the 12 myofascial meridians, explore their ‘meaning’ in stability ,movement, and biopsychology. We will explore the ‘feel’ of specific fascial and myofascial release work in both manual therapy, stretch, and training contexts.

Learning Outcomes:

  • Identify the 12 major myofascial meridians,
  • Understand the role of fascia in maintaining body posture and ‘acture’,
  • Appreciate the body mechanics, hand placement, and tissue feel required for true fascial change,
  • Appreciate the value of global over local treatment for chronic injury or compensation,
  • Understand the difference between ‘short / long’ analysis vs fascial plane analysis,
  • Apply strategies for common postural problems such as pelvic tilt, anterior pelvic shift, shortened posterior rib cage, and forward head posture.
Hide Details

4. The Trillion Dollar Global Problem: Repetitive Stress Injuries; The Answer: Improving Our Clinical Skills in Fascia
Molly Allison, M.S. OTR/L, CHT, SMS, PBP

Details

This hands-on, interactive workshop will give practitioners essential skills to attain more targeted and effective treatment plans for their clients. This course will view upper extremity anatomy through the lens of a Certified Hand and Shoulder Theapist. Myofascial Length Testing, a customized evaluation technique which objectively measures the fascial restrictions in the upper extremities as well as the entire body, will be instructed. These objective measures are key to accurately assess, treat, document, and monitor the progress of clients. Standardized upper extremity examinations will be instructed to determine strength-to-flexibility ratio and the potential for injury in the computer era. Myofascial Meridians specific to the upper extremities will be studied and participants will have opportunities to learn and experience kinesiological assessment to improve their gait in relation to the arm lines. Ultimately, the goal is to improve treatment outcomes and teach a new method that will standardize nomenclature in the Fascial Community, lending to quality evidence based research in the field of fascia. Participants will explore specific upper extremity pathologies along the Anatomy Trains Arm Lines in order to asses, treat and prevent injury in themselves and in their patients/clients. Lastly, workshop participants will put it all together for an integrated evolutionary movement experience!

Hide Details

5. Scar Tissue Management – Principles, Practice and Protocols
Catherine Ryan, RMT
Nancy Keeny Smith, LMT, MLD

Details

The prevalence of occurrence, sequelae and secondary impairments associated with pathophysiological scars present important clinical, economic and social considerations. There is growing evidence that skillfully applied and timely massage therapy (MT) can facilitate better patient outcomes.

This highly practical workshop is designed to assist manual therapy professionals with the development of their clinical expertise – enabling them to work safely and effectively with patients with problematic scars of varying etiology and throughout the various stages of accidental or surgical trauma recovery. Skillfully applied and timely intervention can facilitate an advantageous healing environment in the tissues, augment the healing process, potentially prevent detrimental complications associated with pathophysiological scars (e.g. fibrosis, adhesions and contracture), reduce pain and pruritus, restore function and improve quality of life.

Regardless of trauma etiology (cancer treatment, burns, degloving, surgery, overuse), the healing process includes remodeling of skin, connective tissue (CT) and fascia. Prolonged/excess inflammation and undue mechanical strain/tissue tension have been identified as primary drivers of excess/anomalous collagen deposition (fibrosis) – a hallmark of pathophysiological scars. As consequent fibrotic-collagen is known to be a primary source of pain and dysfunction – tempering profibrotic responses ought to be a clinical focus.

MT has been shown to attenuate aspects of the inflammatory process and (favourably) impact tissue tension – therefore MT may prove viable in its utility to mitigate the pro-fibrotic process associated with pathophysiological scars impacting skin, CT and fascia.

Among noted scar researchers, undue mechanical force is considered the most significant factor in pathophysiological scar formation. Included in the hands-on demonstration will be strategies/methods intended to influence two general classes of receptors sensitive to mechanical forces:

  • Integrins
  • Mechanoreceptors

The theoretical material provides an overview of the foundational science of wound healing and scar formation (normal and abnormal) and considerations for working with the target tissues (skin, CT and fascia) during the various stages of healing and mature scar formation. The experiential component includes instructor demonstrations and participant exchange. Techniques demonstrated include those intended to impact tissue tension, neural sensitivity and lymphatic congestion. Some elements of trauma informed practice will also be covered. Patient-centred care is the mainspring of the instructor’s clinical practice and so too this workshop.

“We are not just treating scars; we are treating people with scars.”

The workshop content is drawn from the instructor’s book: Traumatic Scar Tissue Management – Massage Therapy Principles, Practice and Protocols (Handspring 2016) – a culmination of decades of clinical experience supported by current research and evidence informed best practices. Follow this link for a preview of selected pages: http://handspringpublishing.com/product/traumatic-scar-tissue-management/

Learning Outcomes

  • Use knowledge of foundational science to inform clinical practice.
  • Use knowledge of the process of wound healing/scar formation to inform clinical practice.
  • Use knowledge of the impact of pathophysiological scars on the patient and clinical considerations to inform clinical practice.
  • Safely apply scar tissue assessment procedures and use assessment findings to inform clinical practice.
  • Use charting/evaluation tools to document findings, track progress and inform clinical practice.
  • Select and safely apply appropriate scar management techniques.
Hide Details

Half Day Workshops – Morning (Tuesday)

1. Fascial Manipulation
Language: English with both English and German slides
Antonio Stecco, MD, PhD
Matthais Schmidt, MD

Details

This workshop will illustrate new studies of the gross and histological anatomy of the human fasciae, and explain the biomechanical model for the human fascial system currently applied in the manual technique known as Fascial Manipulation©. The model represents a three dimensional interpretation of the fascial system. Its hypothetical foundations are fruit of more than thirty years of analysis of anatomical texts and clinical practice. More recently, dissections of unembalmed bodies have provided anatomical verification of numerous hypotheses including the fascial continuity between different body segments via myotendinous expansions and the possible distribution of tensional forces.  This workshop will also propose new studies concerning the histological characteristics of superficial and deep fasciae (fibre content, structural conformation, and innervation) and debate the role of deep fascia in proprioception. The Fascial Manipulation© technique is based on the concept of myofascial units (mf units) united in myofascial sequences, and involves manual friction over specific points (called Centres of coordination and Centres of fusion) on the deep muscular fascia. This underlying rationale and the resultant analytical process guides the therapist in the combination of points to be treated and allows therapists to work at a distance from the site of pain, which is often inflamed due to non-physiological tension. Musculoskeletal disorders commonly treated include low back pain; tendinitis, sprains, peripheral nerve compressions, and neck pain syndromes, whereas visceral dysfunctions can include gastritis, irritable colon syndrome, constipation, and dysmenorrhoea.

Specific Learning Objectives
Upon completion of this course, participants will be able to:

  1. Highlight the gross anatomy and histology of the superficial and deep fascia, including the significance of myofascial/myotendinous expansions.
  2. Describe the pathophysiology of fascia, elaborating on the concept of the myofascial sliding system and its contribution to myofascial pain syndrome.
  3. Explain the specific clinical assessment process via illustration of the Assessment Chart and the clinical rationale behind it as well as discuss the therapeutic advantage of the plasticity and malleability of fascia.
  4. Design an appropriate treatment algorithm to alleviate chronic myofascial pain

Schedule:

Introduction of the fascia manipulation technique.

5 min

Physiology

  • The myofascial continuity
  • The role of the hyaluronic acid
  • The muscle spindles in relation to the endomysium and the fascia system
  • The pathology of fascia

45 min

Questions

10 min

Biomechanical model

  • Myofascial Unit, Centre of Coordination, Centre of perception
  • Sequences, management of posture, spatial planes
  • Spirals, centres of fusion, diagonals.

20 min

Questions

10 min

Assessment process

  • Plasticity and malleability of the fascia
  • Clinical rationale and Assessment Chart
  • Data, Hypothesis, Verification, Treatment

20 min

 

Demonstration of a treatment

1.30 hr

Questions and Discussion concerning Fascial Manipulation technique

10 min

Hide Details

2. Eutony – The Gentle Fascia Training
Language: German
Cornelia Sachs
Werner Klingler, MD, PhD

Details

This workshop will introduce a still little known, yet surprisingly effective method to regulate the fascial tonus. The setup of this workshop is a translational approach, combining clinical experiences with novel scientific findings about fascial tonus regulation, such as the influence of tissue pH, temperature, fascial remodelling and notably the influence of the autonomous nervous system on fascial tonus regulation.

The method aims at influencing the whole body or localized fascial tone by using sensory materials as well as gentle movements. Integration of the nervous system requires coordination of the motor cortex and extrapyramidal functions, as well as regulation of efferent and afferent signals, most notably originating from the fascial system. Bones, joints, muscles and inner organs are specifically addressed in conjunction with the fascial system.

Eutony as a method has been established more than half a century ago and used not only by world-class athletes but also e.g. for pain reduction in the elderly. The method is based on several properties of the myofascial system, such as the body-wide three-dimensional architecture, biomechanical links to bones and joints, the presence of mechano-, pain- and thermoreceptors in fascial tissue and notably the strong link of fascial receptors to the autonomous nervous system. 

In regular Eutony classes, participants often lay on their backs and focus their awareness to accompany their activities and how what they are doing changes their self perception and affects their tissues. Verbal expression of these sensations helps participants retain and integrate the sensed self-experiences and deepens the learning process, including the above mentioned biological systems. 

The method uses the elongation of limbs, imagination of movement, micromovement and auxxilllary material, which can then be used as parameters for optimum movement and tonus influence. These different materials (cherry pit pillows, bamboo sticks, woolen ropes or balls, etc.) allow the participants to work as deeply as is comfortable for them and with as much fascial release and pain as they choose in that moment. The practitioner uses a verbal guide in order to obtain the best possible cross-linking of the above-mentioned building blocks for the participants and to have a positive influence either on the whole body or just the localized fascial tone. 

Key elements in Eutony are different principles, like “Touch”, “Contact” or “Transport” for instance. By stimulating the bones with the help of vibrations, the sense of proprioception and depth sensitivity is activated. Developing depth sensitivity is an important component of Eutony, according to the founder Gerda Alexander. It becomes increasingly important for proprioception and fascial tonus regulation in daily activities, which is amiss for the most part in life today. Participants often make reference to daily activities and personal problems. The connectivity between fascial regulation, depth sensitivity and the autonomous nervous system grants access to salutogenetic ways for self-regulation and competence. The Eutony method is gentle and has benefits for improving locomotion, chronic pain and other disorders where fascia are involved. The simplicity, yet obvious effectiveness of this subtle method gives a practical access to impact health issues.

Within this workshop, you will not only experience the method but also learn how to teach your students ways to adapt their fascial tone to current situations. This workshop consists of three parts:

1. Self-experience on the floor: Awareness for the influence of efferent and afferent nervous systems is experienced first hand in your body and you will become increasingly present.
2. Explanation of the concepts and the scientific basis 
3. Instructions on how to teach the previously experienced Eutony lesson

Many people use Eutony in daily life. As an above knee amputee, I am the best example. Before I knew Eutony, I had lots of muscle spasms and back pain. Since experiencing the method in 1981, I have rarely, if ever, suffered from back pain again. Eutony class participants report that the exercises of Eutony have helped avoid falls and even joint surgeries. They know how to help themselves by what I call the  “EFFECT”, i.e. EASY, FAST, FASCIAL, EUTONIC CORRECTION OF TONE.”

Related Publications:
Zullo A, Mancini P, Schleip R, Wearing S, Yahia L, Klingler W. The interplay between fascia, skeletal muscle, nerves, adipose tissue, inflammation and mechanical stress in musculo-fascial regeneration. Submitted 2017
Klingler W, Velders M, Hoppe K, Pedro M, Schleip R. Clinical relevance of fascial tissue and dysfunctions. Curr Pain Headache Rep. 2014;18(8):439
Schleip R, Mechsner F, Zorn A, Klingler W. The bodywide fascial network as a sensory organ for haptic perception. Journal of Motor Behavior, 2014, 46(3): 191-193

Hide Details

3. Ultrasound-Elastography: Assessment of the Elastic Properties of Fascia and Muscle in Sports- and Pain Medicine
Wolfgang Bauermeister, MD, PhD

Details

Conventional imaging techniques like Ultrasound, Magnetic Resonance Imaging or Computed Tomography only show tissue damage and are often misleading when it comes to the diagnosis of pain and dysfunction originating in the fascia and the muscle fibers.Since the cause of these problems is not tissue damage   but the change of the physical properties with stiffening/hardening Ultrasound Elastography is the only imaging technology in daily practice which allows to assess the pathological physical properties of the fascia and the muscle fibers. It identifies the pathology which leads to fibrosis and densification of the fascia and muscle fiber contracture (Trigger Points) along with a neurogenic inflammation resulting in pain and dysfunction. Elastography helps to detect the areas with neurogenic inflammation in all fascial and muscle layers even in those where palpation is feasable. Elastography is very fast and the entire body can be scanned along the Myofascial Trains. It locates the pain and dysfunction producing points or areas which are mostly outside the symptomatic region.  Elastography helps to formulate appropriate treatment approaches, because the effect of a procedure is immediately visible right after the treatment and in later follow-up. Elastography helps to understand the extent of myofascial Problems because they are visible and understandable for both the examiner and the patient. The workshop offers new solutions to a significant problem in sports- and pain medicine where athletes and pain patients can have a prolonged down time when the cause of the pain and dysfunction does not get diagnose and treated appropriately because of the lack of an appropriate diagnostic tool like the Elastography.

Myofascial Pain and dysfunction  caused by trigger points in the fascia and the muscles is mostly not considered because it is difficult to objectively prove the existence of myofascial trigger points (mTrPs). Their related patterns like the Anatomy Trains as perceived by Thomas Myers in the late 1990’s are based on structural connections. Stiffness of fascia and muscle can be palpated and measured to a certain extent, but it cannot be visualized by conventional means like MRI or conventional ultrasound. Ultrasound Elastography has emerged as a tool not only in research but in everyday practice too for the imaging of the Anatomy Trains and the underlying pathophysiology such as mTrPs and fibrosis.

  • Current research: Theory, Shear wave and Strain Elastography, Shockwave therapy and their effect on fascia and muscle
  • Practical application: Clinical Elastography for imaging the different parts of the Myofascial Trains detecting
  • Findings: Putting the results together, relating them to muscle imbalance and pain threshold measurements
  • Treatment effects: Elastography shows the immediate effects of any therapeutic intervention. The effects of manual and other techniques, will be demonstrated.

The participants will learn to perform the Elastography exam, to interpret the findings and incorporate them into a diagnostic and therapeutic strategy.

Any discipline can benefit from the diagnostic properties of Ultrasound-Elastography making the generators of pain and dysfunction in the fascia and the muscle fibers visible and therefore believable. Physical therapists and body workers in general can utilize the technology for therapy assessment. Medical doctors can prescribe specific treatments and control the efficacy of the therapy.

Hide Details

4. Instrument Assisted Soft Tissue Mobilization and Myofascial Decompression Therapy: Research to Clinical Application for Lower Extremity Injuries in Sport
Aric Warren, EdD, ATC, LAT, CSCS, CES
Phillip Vardiman, BS, MS, PhD

Details

The techniques discussed in the workshop are intended to address fascial restriction and the overall health of the fascial network. This workshop will provide insights into current fascia research and treatment of fascial conditions using two common forms of contemporary soft tissue therapy; IASTM and Myofascial Decompression Therapy.  

IASTM is a soft-tissue treatment technique using instruments to provide a mobilizing stimulus to positively affect myofascial adhesion and connective tissue remodeling addressing fascial restrictions. IASTM has been found to be effective in improving range of motion and patient function in chronic musculoskeletal pathology.

Myofascial Decompression Therapy is a mainstream intervention for the treatment of musculoskeletal pain and dysfunction in sport. Using suction, the cups grab and lift the fascia allowing for relief of deep fascial adhesion and stretching the fascial tissue.

These two soft tissue mobilization techniques are widely used in sport to treat chronic and acute syndromes.  A better understanding of the fascia, its function and adaptation to treatments such as this, is necessary for clinicians to improve overall health outcomes.  

Attendees will experience the techniques and will become exposed to evidence based approaches to improve health outcomes of lower extremity injury.  This will be a hands-on workshop with active participation and application of the techniques discussed.  This workshop is appropriate for Physiotherapists, Athletic Trainers, Athletic Therapists, Chiropractors, Physical Therapists, and Physicians. 

Learning Outcomes: 

  1. Present leading concepts and evidence of IASTM and Myofascial Decompression Therapy
  2. Understand the precautions and contraindications for utilizing techniques presented in this course (IASTM and Myofascial Decompression Therapy)
  3. Identify fascial adhesions and restrictions that contribute to discomfort and functional limitation through hands-on testing in lab practice
  4. Exploration and application of techniques discussed through active audience participation
  5. Integration of these techniques and interventions into the overall treatment program for lower extremity injury in sport
Hide Details

5. Fascial Pelvic Floor Training
Divo Mueller, HP

Details

Yogis call it ‘Mula Bandha’ and Pilates Trainers the ‘Powerhouse’. Modern movement science has documented the importance of a healthy tonus regulation of the pelvic floor. Yet conventional training of the pelvic floor has been mainly focusing on strengthening the muscular elements. Modern fascia research highlights the important role of the elastic collagenous tissues to foster a resilient and elastic pelvic floor. These recent findings lead to a reorientation in the training, which will be less muscular and static, but adds in a more elastic, bouncing component as well als other specific exercises to strengthen the fascial sheets and myofascial connections of the inner pelvis. The training principles for a supple and resilient pelvic floor training are: elastic rebound  > muscular toning  >  rehydration  > sensory refinement. In this course Divo Müller will introduce the theory and practice of this innovative fascial oriented approach.

Overview of topics in theory and practice

  • The pelvic bones and the concept of the ‘inner diamond’
  • Three functional muscular layers
  • Specific fasciae of the pelvis, including the pelvic floor
  • Myofascial chains across the pelvis with relevance for a healthy tonus regulation
  • Myofascial pain syndrome in a male and a female pelvic floor
  • Hormonal influences, loss of tonicity and fibrosis of collagenous tissues
  • The four training principles: sensory refinement, rebound elasticity, muscular toning, and fascial release
  • Practical exercises for each power principle

Participants will learn about the different functional roles of the fascial system and of the importance of collagenous tissues for a healthy and resilient pelvic floor. The focus will be on the myofascial connections and their force transmission as well as the interaction of the diaphragm and breath for a strong- elastic as well as supple-flexible pelvic floor. Tension and fibrosis of the collagenous fiber network in addition to densification of the ground substance have been suggested to contribute to myofascial pain syndrome, incontinence, and to a loss of elastic power in the pelvic floor. Therefore, a comprehensive pelvic floor training should complement muscular components with specific training stimulations for related collagenous tissues.

The workshop will invite participants to a playful fascia oriented training involving:

  • elastic rebound movements to enhance fascial resilience 
  • release and rehydration as self-treatment techniques with foam rollers and balls
  • enhancing interoception and self-sensing via breath and guided sensory refinement exercises. 
Hide Details

6. The fascial cardiac system and osteopathic treatment
Bordoni Bruno, DO, PhD
Morabito Bruno, DO, BSc OT

Details

The different organs of the mediastinum are in communication thanks to visceral fascial relations. The visceral fascia that covers the organs and connects them with other organs is able to stretch and adapt to the shape and movements of the viscera. In presence of traumas, infections and inflammations, it loses its compliance and adaptability with the viscera, causing restriction of movement and pain. The pain coming from the viscera, caused by the stiffness of the visceral fascia, could not only be one of the causes of perceived pain, but it could also contribute to the lack of neuromotor coordination of the patients.

The main purpose is to illustrate how to work the cardiac fascial area. The course wants to give the tools of knowledge and the correct manualness to work with the cardiac fascial system.

The workshop has several objectives, as illustrate the fascial connections of the heart within the mediastinum, systemic cardiac function (vascular, immune, postural, emotional, craniosacral rhythm, neuromotor coordination of limbs and more). The course will illustrate the osteopathic manual approaches for the cardiac and cardiac surgery patient, following the expression of the fascial cardiac system. How to position the operator’s hand on recent scars and drainage, and how to work manually the phrenic nerve, the vagus nerve and the sympathetic system. Techniques have been used for some scientific studies, demonstrating their clinical validity.

The heart is not fixed in its anatomical position, and to maintain its health and function, it must be able to adapt to internal and external stresses, often changing shape and thickness. It is not only intended as a mediastinal viscera, but as a fundamental structure for improving systemic health, as a manual treatment route for solving clinical symptoms.

Morning session 9:00 am – 12:30:
9:00 Theoretical introductory part on the cardiac fascial system and the fascial relationships of the heart within the mediastinum.
10:00 Practical part, based on the osteopathic approach to the cardiac fascial system.
11:00 Break.
11:15 – 12:15 Practical part, based on the osteopathic approach to the cardiac fascial system. Current research.
12:15 – 12:30 Discussion.

Hide Details

Half Day Workshops – Afternoon (Tuesday)

1. Fascia in Sport Injury Prevention
Language: German
Christina Halasz, MSc
Tiina Lahtinen-Suopanki

Details

Ankle sprains are one of the most common sport injuries. Recent MRI studies show, that ankle retinacula alteration corresponds to the proprioceptive damage.

Based on several new anatomical and biomechanical studies we will explain the role of the retinacula in the function of the ankle and how fascial alterations can change the activity of muscles and tendons and lead to problems like instability.

New insights will also be given about the role of the paratenon in pain of the Achilles tendon.

We will give an introduction to the concept of Fascial Manipulation®, developed by physiotherapist Luigi Stecco. This biomechanical model represents a 3-dimensional interpretation of the human fascial system (Stecco L, 2004) that facilitates the comprehension of fascial dysfunctions. We will demonstrate how it can be used to improve proprioception and functional stability in the ankle and prevent tendinitis and other dysfunction.

Hide Details

2. Treatment of the visceral fascia of the Carotid Sheath on the neck, improving circulation by treating fascial connections to the head, the thorax and the upper extremity
Language: German
Andreas Haas, LMT

Details

Decreased blood flow in the carotid artery is a common cause for circulation deficiency in the skull, leading to different symptoms like vertigo, visual or acoustic constraints, nausea, impaired speech or deglutition and other more.

This workshop will help manual therapists to develop a treatment strategy for circulatory restriction caused by fascial alterations like adhesions, fibrosis or scars affecting the carotid sheath. This treatment strategy includes local techniques and peripheral approaches in case of local contraindications. This workshop provides a detailed understanding of the anatomy and physiology of the fascia of the neck, it’s layering, alignment and territorial arrangement. It shows the connections between the local fascia of the Carotid on the neck and the fascia of the skull, the thorax and the upper extremity. Those connections are the myofascial and articular fascia of the temporomandibular joint, myofascial chains passing over the shoulder to the upper extremity providing lateral abduction, the thoracic region including Mediastinum, Pericardium and Diaphragm as well as Neuro-fascia surrounding the Vagus Nerve. Participants will learn how stress on the carotid sheath can spread out via fascial chains to certain other regions of the body. This information will provide treatment strategies for the improvement of circulation and blood flow in the neck and the head.

The workshop explains how to palpate and evaluate the fascia of the neck, especially of the Carotid Sheath as a fundament for manual therapies. Further on it shows treatment strategies including local techniques as well as treatment of fascial chains to the head, the thorax and the upper extremity. Connections between the circulation of the neck and other organs in the neck and the thorax are pointed out as well as linkage to the nervous systems.

The workshop will show the fascia of the Carotid Sheath on the neck and its connections:

  • to the deep fascia of the skull including the myofascial and articular fascia of the temporomandibular joint
  • to the upper extremity including the myofascial chain of the lateral abduction of the shoulder and the arm
  • to the Mediastinum and the Pericardium and the Diaphragm
  • to the Vagus Nerve
Hide Details

3. ZeroTonic Approach – Re-Thinking “Passive” Exercise
Leonid Blyum, MSc

Details

Passive therapeutic stimulation of physiological tissues has long provided quantifiable benefits translating to functional improvements. Immediate benefits of such stimulation are distinguished by its ability to lower sympathetic tonus, alter local viscosity, and, in turn, perhaps augment one’s proprioceptive and interoceptive abilities. Long-term benefits of passive therapeutic stimulation are supported by the principle that stress stimulus is required to maintain healthy mechanical homeostasis as it is a regulatory factor of local mechanotransduction processes. This notion has been further evaluated in the form of repetitive motion strain analyses and their respective impact on tissue. It has been demonstrated that simulated repetitive motion strain can elicit interleukin secretion and cellular proliferation suggesting the plausibility that fibroblast proliferation may be upregulated as well. Thus, passive therapeutic stimulation may enable the treatment of hypotoned tissues in under stimulated musculoskeletal structure(s) that hinder the function of joints. This workshop’s methods lie within the planning and execution of this passive therapeutic stimulation through careful pre- and post-treatment assessments. The technique is mathematically viable based on the rate of induced tissue stimulation deformation and the reactive mechanical response. Moreover, careful interpretation of the elastic phase of the fascial tissue is demonstrated thought direct haptic feedback.

Hide Details

4. Ligamentous Articular Strain Techniques for the Shoulder
Robert Libbey, RMT

Details

This course will educate the clinician with evidence-informed research supporting Ligamentous Articular Strain Techniques (LAST) to improve treatment outcomes. Participants will learn specific and precise assessment and treatment techniques to recognise and effectively treat neurofascial force-coupling dysfunctions of the shoulder.

This interactive workshop combines demonstration with hands-on practical application and feedback. Clinicians will learn Ligament Pain Referral Patterns for the shoulder, supported by the Neurophysiological Model for referred pain. Clinicians will leave with the knowledge, skills and confidence to immediately integrate LAST into their clinical practice.

Research from Schleip (2003) & Pelletier et. al. (2015) recommends that therapists change their perspective of treatment from a purely mechanical perspective to one that also is inclusive of nervous system modulation strategies. Ligamentous injuries are seen not just as simple musculoskeletal peripheral joint injuries, but as neurophysiological dysfunctions. Peripheral joint injuries affect the healthy functioning of tissues and produce nerve signalling that elicits protective myofascial guarding, sensorimotor impairment and pain. Changes in fascial plasticity and neuroplasticity contribute to chronicity of injuries and slow rehabilitation. LAST is a precise, principle-based, mechanoreceptor specific manual therapy technique. It is supported by evidence-informed research and is utilized in the treatment of peripheral joint tissue injuries, in order to improve treatment outcomes and improve the quality of life of patients. LAST influences the fascial system and CNS modulation by targeting the ligamentoperiosteal and tenoperiosteal entheses which are areas known to have high concentrations of mechanoreceptors. Mechanoreceptor specific techniques that target peripheral joint tissues affect autonomic nervous system functions, which in turn results in decreased protective myofascial engagement, increased pain pressure sensitivity, normalized kinesthetic and proprioceptive awareness, thus improving treatment outcomes.

By the end of this hands-on workshop, Clinicians will be able to:

  • specifically palpate the fascial/ligamentous structures of the shoulder demonstrated in class
  • identify dysfunctional neurofascial force-coupling patterns by specific motion testing the shoulder
  • reproduce in-class demonstrations of assessment and treatment techniques for shoulder dysfunctions
  • describe how referred pain occurs according to the Neurophysiological Model
  • recognise the typical Ligamentous Pain Referral Patterns of the shoulder

Clinicians should wear appropriate clothing to allow access to the anterior upper thorax and GH Jnt.

Hide Details

5. Getting Under our Own Skin: Fascia, Interoception, & Emotional Health
Bo Forbes, PsyD, E-RYT500, C-IAYT

Details

The world of living tissue underneath our skin is constantly moving in a symphony of “intelligent chaos.” In much the same way, our field of sensory experience fluctuates from moment to moment, and mirrors our mental and emotional experience. The ability to be present with changing bodily sensation—or visceral resilience—transfers “up” to the brain and fosters emotional resilience. This makes attention to bodily sensation (and to the unpredictable wilderness of our connective tissue) a valuable training ground in contemplative practice. Emerging research in cognitive and affective neuroscience highlights interoception, the ability to receive, appraise, and respond to momentary bodily sensation. When this ability is compromised, we experience interoceptive dysregulation and “disorders of disembodiment” such as anxiety, depression, chronic pain, and post-traumatic stress. Conversely, building interoceptive presence can benefit physical health, emotional regulation, and social connections. This talk will focus on the relationship between fascia, interoception, and emotional health. It will explore clinical applications and suggest best practices for interoceptive training through the fascia for a population with emotionally-mediated illnesses such as mood disorders and chronic pain. Participants will benefit from practical "anchors” for interoceptive presence that can be used in somatic meditation and mindful movement training with a variety of populations.

After taking this workshop, participants will be able to:

  • Describe at least two areas of overlap between fascia research and the science of interoception
  • Discuss an element of both fascia and interoception that offers a training ground for contemplative practice
  • Discuss at least two ways in which interoceptive presence improves emotionally-mediated disorders such as anxiety, depression, or chronic pain
  • Describe two techniques to increase interoceptive awareness via self-directed fascial therapy
Hide Details

6. Self-Care Application of Connective Tissue Science: How self-treatment of the connective tissue system can address sports-related injuries and improve athletic performance
Sue Hitzmann, MS, CST, NM

Details

This workshop will simplify profound fascial science regarding repetitive sports injuries and athletic performance through self-care application.

Participants will experience Hands-Off Bodywork® and apply light-touch therapeutic intervention using soft balls and rollers on their own body. We will explore how to improve stability and restore balance to the nervous system by affecting cellular hydration in the fascial matrix using the MELT Method. To this purpose, we will:

  • Discuss the relationship between repetitive stress, deformation of connective tissue, and chronic pain symptoms.
  • Suggest five new models for the function and efficiency of living bodies that simplify complex scientific concepts ranging from basic anatomy to neurological models.
  • Propose MELT as a non-invasive treatment to address specific chronic pain symptoms caused by fascial impairment, dehydration, and deformation and to improve bodywide signalling, muscle tone and timing, and ground-force reaction.
  • Propose how connective tissue dehydration and deformation are the catalyst for nondisease-related chronic pain symptoms and promote research in this new field of neurofascial science.
  • Explore the “indirect before direct” approach and how Hands-Off Bodywork complements hand-on therapists’ work while empowering clients to actively partake in their healing.
  • Enable primary and complementary professionals to incorporate information on the role of the connective tissue and autonomic nervous systems in chronic pain elimination and performance.
  • Introduce the MELT Protocol and the 4 R’s of MELT: Reconnect, Rebalance, Rehydrate, and Release.
  • Lead a 90-minute interactive session to demonstrate the MELT Method and the techniques of Hands-Off Bodywork.
Hide Details

Fascial Anatomy Workshops

The workshops will be held in the anatomical teaching facilities of the Plastinarium in Guben. The workshops will include the use of a formalin-fixated full body specimen.

FASCIAL ANATOMY THREE-DAY PROSECTION WORKSHOP (limited to 26 participants)
Saturday-Monday, November 10-12, 2018, 08:30 – 18:00 (click details below for the course schedule)

FASCIAL ANATOMY ONE-DAY DISSECTION WORKSHOP (limited to 9 participants)
Tuesday, November 13, 2018, 08:30 – 18:00

WORKSHOP FEE: EU 885 (EU 780 FRS Member) for the 3-day workshop, EU 280 (EU 238 FRS Member) for the 1-day workshop.

Learn about FRS membership. FRS members: log into the Fascia Research Society website to confirm that your membership is current. It will need to remain current at the start of the workshop.


Three-day Fascial Anatomy Prosection Workshop, November 10-12
Carla Stecco, MD
Andry Vleeming, PhD

Details

First day

 

 

8:30-9:00

Introduction

Andry Vleeming

9:00-10:00

Superficial and deep fasciae: an overview

Carla Stecco

10:30-13:00

Dissection of fasciae and muscles of thorax and upper limb

Carla Stecco

13:00-14:00

Lunch

 

14:00-16:00

The shoulder (with prosections)

Andry Vleeming

16:30-18:00

Dissection of the back

Carla Stecco

Second day

 

 

8:30-10:30

The thoracolumbar fascia: lecture

Andry Vleeming

11:00-13:00

Dissection of the gluteal region and thigh

Carla Stecco

13:00-14:00

Lunch

 

14:00-16:00

The pelvis (with prosections)

Andry Vleeming

16:30-18:00

Dissection of the leg and foot

Carla Stecco

Third day

 

 

8:30-9:30

The pelvis (Lecture)

Andry Vleeming

9:30-10:30

Head and neck fasciae (Lecture)

Carla Stecco

11:00-13:00

Dissection of the head and neck

Carla Stecco

13:00-14:00

Lunch

 

14:00-15:00

The visceral fasciae  (lecture)

Carla Stecco

15:00-18:00

Dissection of the abdomen

Carla Stecco

Hide Details

One-day Fascial Anatomy Dissection Workshop, November 13
This course will use the same formalin-fixated body or segments from the three day workshop, but will be led by Plastinarium staff.


Please note that while speakers and topics were confirmed at the time of publishing, circumstances beyond the control of the organizers may necessitate substitutions, alterations or cancellations of the speakers and/or topics. As such, the Fifth International Fascia Research Congress reserves the right to alter or modify the advertised speakers and/or topics if necessary without any liability to you whatsoever. Any substitutions or alterations will be updated on our web page as soon as possible.